Rhesus

Infinite Planetary Destruction

Fly as an asteroid and cause space havoc by destroying planets and collecting their remains as trophies! No one said that asteroids are nice…

Quick reflexes and sharp wits will be needed as your journey will be perilous. Build up your defenses for you are as fragile as you are deadly!

Developed with Maria Saint Martín in Unity for Game Studio 1 at the NYU Game Center (3 weeks).

Rhesus was showcased on NYU Game Center’s Practice 2013 and IndieCade East 2014.

Can be played with either a Keyboard or a Xbox 360 Controller.

Platforms available: Windows and Mac

Controls

Keyboard:

  • Movement (Arrow keys)
  • Enter key

Xbox 360 Controller:

  • Movement (Left stick)
  • Start button

To Quit the Game:

  • Windows (ALT+F4)
  • Mac (Comm+Q)

Rules

  • Collect as many shards as you can (they are your points)
  • Destroy planets to find shards
  • Collide with a planet while having a shield to destroy them
  • Touch a yellow moon to get a shield (it will be kept around you)
  • You can have up to four yellow moons at the same time
  • You lose one moon every time you destroy a planet
  • You get point multipliers by destroying planets in quick succession
  • You lose if you collide with a planet while having no shield

Download Links

Click HERE for the Windows version.

Click HERE for the Mac version.

Play Online Now!

Click HERE to play Rhesus on your browser!

Postmortem

I had a lot of fun developing Rhesus with Maria. This was the first time I developed something using Unity and I had no experience in C# whatsoever, so the first days were very busy and stressful.

For this project all students had to make a score attack game, so we decided our type of game on the very first day: an infinite runner. We didn’t want, however, to just make another Temple Run as it would be very unoriginal. We started brainstorming on ideas in which the obstacles that kill the players are also the source of their score. This little twist was just what we needed to make it different from what we usually see around.

The last piece we were missing was the theme but that soon was solved: After a happy accident while learning particle effects we decided to use a “space theme” (a particle effect I accidentally created for fun looked like a cool star field). A infinite runner in space where obstacles can kill you but are also the source of your score sounded very interesting and from that we created our little protagonist: a gray asteroid that would create chaos by destroying planets and collecting their “remains”.

The basics: Players had to dodge planets to survive until they collected yellow moons around the screen to earn a shield. With the shield, they could destroy planets by colliding with them and be able to collect those precious shards that represented the score. Shield was expended with every collision, so players had to balance between being safe or going for a high score multiplier (a little cool risk vs reward situation).

A few days after we already had a working prototype and it was surprisingly fun. I really enjoyed seeing my friends playing the game and quickly pressing the restart button to try again after losing. There is nothing more satisfying to a game designer than to see your users engage with your creations.

By the end I was in charge of most of the coding and Maria was in charge of tweaking the game feel and user interface (of course, we both did a little of everything). It was very nice to make a project with someone else so I could learn how to share roles and merge changes.

The game is hard and is still very broken, but I couldn’t be happier with it. I learned a lot of Unity and C# and had a blast working with someone as talented as Maria (you should seriously check her website).